Hi-Lift Jack Review
3.5/5
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Product Description

The Hi-Lift Jack is available in stamped steel/cast, all-cast, and X-Treme versions in lengths from 36 to 60 inches. The Hi-Lift Jack offers a rated capacity of 4,660 pounds and a tested capacity of 7,000 pounds. Load your user review below. Be sure to include the specific model you are reviewing.

User Reviews
Date Reviewed:
October 16, 2015, 1:01 am
Strengths:
Great tool. Used them for 45 years, Strong and dependable
Weaknesses:
Not for stupid people
Bottom Line:
I carry 2,
Similar Products Used
4X4 Setup
05 Rubicon Unlimited
Favorite Trail
Argentite Canyon NV
Price Paid
fair
Purchased at
Cal Ranch
Used Time
Please choose
Most Frequent Terrain
Please choose
Value Rating
2
Overall Rating
1
Posted Comments
    Date Reviewed:
    October 05, 2015, 9:09 pm
    Strengths:
    It's extremely versatile. The 48-inch jack can lift most 4x4s off the ground. It's a brutal and durable piece of machinery. It can be easily attached and stored on rollcages, bumpers, roof racks and on body panels if you have or can build the right brackets. I've used it as a winch too. It can be slow going for that purpose, but few other jacks have that ability. I've also successfully used it as a giant clamp.
    Weaknesses:
    Everyone leaves them outside unlubricated, and then complains that they don't work well. When the climbing pins get dirty or rusty, the Hi-Lift mechanism does not work smoothly. I've experimented with a few different lubricants. Dry film waxes like Jigg-a-lube work pretty good and don't attract as much dirt as an oil lubricant. Keep a small can of lubricant handy and you never have issues.The jack can be really unstable so it's not a good idea to crawl around under a vehicle without extra supports and safety precautions.
    Bottom Line:
    I have several Hi-Lift jacks. I've used both the standard and cast 48-inch versions. The cast version is worth the extra money if you plan to use it regularly. If you only plan to use it to change a tire now and then, the less expensive stamped steel version is fine. I also use my Hi-Lift on my trailer. I can lift the loaded trailer by the frame and not worry about bending an axle with a traditional jack.
    Similar Products Used
    Floor and bottle jacks. Imported farm jacks. OEM threaded jacks.
    4X4 Setup
    Everything from a '73 J-2000 on 49-inch tires and Rockwell axles, to a rock buggy and near stock 4x4s
    Favorite Trail
    Ocotillo Wells
    Price Paid
    About $60
    Purchased at
    4-Wheel Parts
    Used Time
    1 Year or Longer
    Most Frequent Terrain
    Recreational Trails
    Value Rating
    5
    Overall Rating
    4
    Posted Comments
      Date Reviewed:
      October 05, 2015, 8:08 pm
      Strengths:
      In my opinion, the Hi-Lift jack has been the right tool for the job for decades. And it's still pretty darn inexpensive! The one I've used on my Jeep for 20 years is an all-cast unit.
      Weaknesses:
      The only challenge I run into is you have to lubricate the mechanism, which attracts dirt which requires more lubrication. And I use a big rock to "switch" the mechanism from raising to lowering.
      Bottom Line:
      For high clearance vehicles in off-road situations, nothing I've tried has been more effective or versatile.
      Similar Products Used
      4X4 Setup
      1946 Jeep CJ2A on 35s with a V8
      Favorite Trail
      Sledgehammer
      Price Paid
      $100
      Purchased at
      4-Wheel Parts
      Used Time
      1 Year or Longer
      Most Frequent Terrain
      Rock
      Value Rating
      5
      Overall Rating
      5
      Posted Comments
        Date Reviewed:
        October 05, 2015, 8:08 pm
        Strengths:
        This product is multifunction. It can be used as a jack, a winch, a clamp, and the handle (in cases of emergency) can be used as breaker bar. The 60" model is great for lifting long suspension travel rigs, giving you more height for recovery in soft or deep areas, as well as providing a longer pulling area for the infrequent need to use it as a winch.It can mount in numerous locations, endure the roughest of climates, and can literally save you a lot of dough in recovery costs. I have even seen a hi-lift used as a temp replacement link in case of trail brakeage.
        Weaknesses:
        60" hi-lifts are hard to store on a vehicle unless they are stored mounted to the side of the vehicle in a horizontal, vertical or diagonal position. To store a hi-lift, custom mounting points need to be purchased or fabricated. They are heavy to carry. These jacks can be extremely dangerous, if not used correctly or with caution. Many times a wider base is needed for the hi-lift to be used in soft terrains. They require custom lift points, such as HD bumpers, rock rails, or chassis connection points to be able to use the jack with a vehicle.
        Bottom Line:
        All in all, I highly recommend the hi-lifts jacks. I have had two of them. I have used them in many different situations and find them to be worth the inherant negatives that come with owning one. A hi-lifts benefits outway the negatives for sure. Even still, with all the benefits that come with owning a hi-lift, it's always a good idea to carry another jack as well. I always have a bottle jack in my rig too.
        Similar Products Used
        Generic brand tractor jacks
        4X4 Setup
        Isuzu Trooper with 2" lift and custom rear bumper. Daihatsu F73/Fourtrak with chassis mount tow/jack mounts, and custom rear bumper.
        Favorite Trail
        Price Paid
        $150 U.S (equivalent)
        Purchased at
        Chilean S.A. Off-road store and on Ebay.com
        Used Time
        1 Year or Longer
        Most Frequent Terrain
        Overlanding
        Value Rating
        5
        Overall Rating
        4
        Posted Comments